Story behind Cards-Clydesdales connection

There is a tradition that has become so synonymous with Cardinals baseball that even in the heart of winter, it’s fun to think about when we will hear the hooves of Clydesdales trotting around the warning track of Busch Stadium again. The Anheuser-Busch Clydesdales have become a staple of the

There is a tradition that has become so synonymous with Cardinals baseball that even in the heart of winter, it’s fun to think about when we will hear the hooves of Clydesdales trotting around the warning track of Busch Stadium again.

The Anheuser-Busch Clydesdales have become a staple of the Cardinals’ Opening Day tradition, and thus a symbol of Cards baseball and St. Louis for almost five decades. But when and how were these horses introduced to the Cardinals? There’s more to the story than just the Cards’ connection to the Anheuser-Busch brewery in St. Louis.

The Budweiser Clydesdales were first introduced to the public on April 7, 1933, to celebrate the repeal of Prohibition. August A. Busch Jr. presented the horses — pulling a red, white and gold beer wagon — to his father, August A. Busch Sr., outside the brewery. The hitch carried the first case of post-Prohibition beer from the brewery down Pestalozzi Street in St. Louis. Recognizing the advertising and promotional potential of a horse-drawn beer wagon, Busch Sr. sent the team of horses on a tour of New England and the Mid-Atlantic states.

The promotional…

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